Conflict Resolution Education Catalog of Grant Websites
Updated: June 7, 2009.
Questions? Robdarrow@csufresno.edu

Keywords used to search: conflict resolution, dispute resolution, grants, foundation, conflict resolution education, character education.

Format of website link
Name of Website. Link Address.
Description/Purpose of Grant or Website:

Foundations/grant programs most likely to fund a conflict resolution education program in Fresno


Braitmayer Foundation - http://www.braitmayerfoundation.org/guid.htm
The Foundation is pleased to have its grants used anywhere in the United States as seed money, challenge grants, or to match other grants to the recipient organizations. The Foundation does not make grants to individuals, multi year grants, nor grants for general operating, endowment purposes or building programs. Unless a small percentage of the total amount requested, normally the Foundation does not make grants for childcare, pre-kindergarten, or after school programs nor for equipment including hardware, software, and books. Presently, the Foundation has two mechanisms for making grants depending upon their size. Grant periods: June 1 and Nov. 15.

Educational Foundation of America - **www.efaw.org**

Scope: The Educational Foundation of America, established in 1959 by the co-founder of Prentice-Hall educational publishers, seeks to encourage progressive change with its grant making. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to, the environment, reproductive freedom, theatre, education, medicine drug policy reform, democracy, peace and national security issues and human services.
Areas:
The foundation prefers to make innovative pilot project or seed grants that could have national or international ramifications. It avoids contributions to projects so large that a grant would not make a significant difference, and long-term support.
Deadline:
Letters of inquiry, submitted by e-mail using EFA’s online form, are accepted year-round. EFA staff reviews all letters, and requests further information as needed. If interested, an EFA board member will be assigned as sponsor and a letter of invitation for full application issued.
Funds:
Recent grants ranged from $10,000 to $400,000 each.
Eligibility:
Nonprofit organizations that have IRS tax-exempt status and are not private foundations.

Health In Schools
http://www.healthinschools.org/News-Room/Grant-Alerts/Do-Something-Grants-Formerly-Plum-Grants.aspx
The Center for Health and Health Care in Schools (CHHCS) is a nonpartisan resource center at The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services.

MacArthur Foundation - http://www.macfound.org/site/c.lkLXJ8MQKrH/b.3599935/k.66CA/MacArthur_Foundation_Home.htm
The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grant making institution dedicated to helping groups and individuals foster lasting improvement in the human condition. The Foundation seeks the development of healthy individuals and effective communities; peace within and among nations; responsible choices about human reproduction; and a global ecosystem capable of supporting healthy human societies. The Foundation pursues this mission by supporting research, policy development, dissemination, education and training, and practice.

The Starr Foundation - **http://fdncenter.org/grantmaker/starr**
Scope:
The Starr Foundation was created by the estate of Mr. Starr, a pioneer of globalization, and is one of the largest private foundations in the United States. The foundation has assets of approximately $3.5 billion and makes grants in a number of areas, including education, medicine and health care, human needs, public policy, culture and the environment. The foundation has no set guidelines, except that requests fall into an area of interest: education, medicine and health care, human needs, public policy, and culture. An application form is not required.
Deadline:
None. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.
Funds:
In 2003, an average grant was $25,000 to $125,000.
Contact:
The Starr Foundation, 399 Park Ave., 17th Floor, New York, NY 10022, (212) 909-3600

United States Institute of Peace – **www.usip.org**
The Annual Grant Competitionhttp://www.usip.org/grants/
The United States Institute of Peace is an independent, nonpartisan federal institution created and funded by Congress to strengthen the nation's capacity to promote the peaceful resolution of international conflict. The Institute has an array of programs including grants, fellowships, conferences and workshops, library services, publications, and other educational activities. This grant program supports innovative peace building projects involving research, the identification of promising models and effective practices, the development of practitioner resources and tools, the development and delivery of education, training and dialogue programs, and the production of films, radio programs, and other media.


Grants/Foundations Related to Conflict Resolution


Adrian Ramirez Section

1.
JAMS Foundation. http://www.jamsfoundation.org

JAMS, the nation’s premier provider of private dispute resolution services, established the non-profit JAMS Foundation to offer financial assistance for conflict resolution initiatives with national or international impact and to share its dispute resolution experience and expertise for the benefit of the public interest. Funded entirely by contributions from JAMS, JAMS neutrals, and employee associates, the Foundation’s mission is to encourage the use of alternative dispute resolution, support education at all levels about collaborative processes for resolving differences, promote innovation in conflict resolution, and advance the settlement of conflict worldwide.
Grant Focus: The JAMS Foundation Board of Directors reviews and approves new grant proposals on a quarterly basis. Grants are typically approved for a one-year period or less, though in some instances the Board will consider funding multi-year projects. Focus on conflict resolution type projects.

2. United States Institute of Peace - http://www.usip.org/grants/
The Annual Grant Competition funds projects focused on preventing, managing, and resolving violent conflict and promoting post-conflict peace-building in settings outside the borders of the U.S. Awards support activities that apply across a broad range of relevant disciplines, skills, and approaches. USIP welcomes proposals of an interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary nature. Topic areas of interest to USIP include, but are not limited to:

  • Conflict analysis and prevention;
  • Mediation and conflict resolution;
  • Post-conflict peace and stability operations;
  • Religion and peacemaking;
  • Women and girls in conflict and peace-building;
  • Rule of law and transitional justice;
  • Economies and conflict;
  • Social, psychological, and physical impacts of war and conflict;
  • Media and conflict.
Grant Focus: American and foreign individuals and nonprofit organizations may apply. Most USIP grants are one to two years in duration. Most awards fall in the range of $40,000 to $120,000. Proposed grant budgets are reviewed by USIP staff, and are subject to modification. The deadline is October 1, 2009.

3. Abar Foundation -
c/o Merrill Lynch Trust Co.
P.O. Box 1525
Pennington, NJ 08534-0686
Established in 2000 in New Jersey, the grant primarily awards programs in California and Utah. The granting agency contributes only to pre-selected organizations that it invites to submit applications.
Grant Focus: Athletics, Dispute Resolution, Human Services and Secondary school/education.

4. Association for Conflict Resolution - http://www.acrnet.org
5151 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., No. 500
Washington, DC 20016
The association grants to individuals in the field of dispute resolution.
Grant Focus: The association works to enhance the practice and public understanding of conflict resolution. Grants are made to young professionals or graduate students starting a career in the conflict resolution field.

5. Human Development Commission - http://www.hdc-caro.org
429 Montage Ave.
Caro, MI 48723-1921
Established in 1965 in MI, the organization attempts to empower individuals and communities to identify their needs and secure the resources necessary to achieve their goals of self-sufficiency and improved quality of life. The organization normally receives a substantial part of its support from a governmental unit or from the general public
Grant Focus: Aging centers/services, Dispute Resolution, Family Services, Housing/shelter services, and Transportation.

6. Los Altos Community Foundation - http://www.lostaltoscf.org
183 Hillview Ave.
Lost Altos, CA 94022-3742
The foundation supports the community by making grants for local programs, building an endowment for the future, and managing philanthropic funding for other organizaitons.
Grant Focus: Giving primarily for the arts, Conflict Resolution, community building, and leadership development as well as education and higher education. Primarly grants are given in the Los Altos Hills, CA and surrounding unincorporated areas, however, others are awarded in CA.

7. The Joseph Matteucci Foundation - http://www.jmf4peace.org
P.O. Box 20397
Castro Valley, CA 94546-8397
Established in 1994 in CA, the purpose of the foundation in that it makes a positive impact on the lives of young people through speaking in schools, funding mediation programs, promoting a sports emblem program, and finding sponsors for memorial scholarships in high schools.
Grant Focus: Athletics, Children and youth services, Crime violence prevention, Dispute Resolution, and Higher Education.

8. New Foundations Nonviolence Center - http://home.earthlink.net/~nfnc
901 W. 14th Ave. Ste. 7
Denver, CO 80204
The center provides courses in communication skills, affirmation, cooperation, and conflict resolution.
Grant Focus: Crime and violence prevention as well as Dispute Resolution.

9. Nuclear Age Peace Foundation - http://www.wagingpeace.org
1187 Coast Village Rd. Ste. 1 PMB121
Santa Barbara, CA 93108-2761
Established in 1982, the foundation provides giving to national and international agencies and non-profits.
Grant Focus: The foundation initiates and supports worldwide efforts to abolish nuclear weapons, strengthen international law and institutions, and inspire and empower a new generation of peace leaders. Areas of emphasis include Dispute Resolution, International Affairs, arms control, International Conflict Resolution, International peace and security.

10. Surdna Foundation, Inc. - http://www.surdna.org
330 Madison Ave., 30th Fl.
New York, NY 10017-5001
Incorporated in 1917 in New York.
Grant Focus: The foundation focuses on five areas: Environment, Community Revitalization, Building an Effective Citizenry (conflict resolution), The Arts, and the Non-profit Sector.

11. Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars - http://www.wilsoncenter.org
1 Woodrow Wilson Plz.
1300 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W.
Washington, DC 20004-3027
Established by an act of Congress in 1968 in Washington, DC. The mission of the center is to commemorate the ideals and concerns of Woodrow Wilson by providing a link between world of ideas and the world of policy, and fostering research, study, discussion, and collaboration among a full spectrum of individuals concerned with policy and scholarship in national and world affairs.
Grant Focus: The grantmaker has identified the following categories of grants: Fellowships, Internships, Scholarships, Research, and In-kind Gifts. The following areas of interest: American studies, Dispute Resolution, Economics, Environment, Energy, Government/Public Admin, Historical Activities, International Affairs, International Econ Development, Public Affairs, Research, and Urban Studies.

Klaus Tenbergen Section

12. The Morris K. Udall Scholarship and Excellence in National Environmental Policy Foundation - http://www.udall.gov/
To honor former Arizona Congressman Morris K. Udall through the operation of internship, scholarship, and fellowship programs, financed by a permanent trust fund endowment, to develop increased opportunities for young Americans to prepare for and pursue careers related to the environment and to Native Americans and Alaska Natives who intend to pursue careers in health care and tribal public policy.
http://www.federalgrantswire.com/morris-k-udall-fellowship-program.html

13. * Centre for Conflict Resolution. **http://ccrweb.ccr.uct.ac.za** *
For its project, HIV/AIDS and Militaries in South Africa and Africa to examine the impact of HIV/AIDS on regional security and the relationship between South Africa and the rest of Africa; to deepen understanding of the links between HIV/AIDS and national and human security among South African government officials, academics and civil society actors; and to provide a platform for policymakers to assess challenges and opportunities for implementing scaled up HIV/AIDS prevention, care and support from a conflict management and security perspective.
Program Goal: Addressing the Societal Impact of HIV/AIDS
http://www.rbf.org/grantsdatabase/grantsdatabase_show.htm?doc_id=616880


14. William & Flora Hewlett Foundation
. http://www.hewlett.org 525 Middlefield Rd Ste 200. Menlo Park, CA 94025
Contact information: 2121 Sandhill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025
Telephone: (650) 234-4500
FAX: (650) 234-4501

Created in 1966 by Hewlett-Packard co-founder Bill Hewlett and his wife Flora "to promote the well-being of mankind," the Hewlett Foundation today concentrates its grantmaking activities in the areas of conflict resolution, education, environment, family and community development, performing arts, population, and U.S.-Latin American relations. Most of its grants are awarded to U.S.-based organizations, so be sure to check the foundation's Web site for specific program guidelines.

KEY RESOURCE SITES FOR FINDING FUNDING/SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
    1. The Peace and Collaborative Development There are hundreds of scholarship and fellowship opportunities posted on this site. You can find these opportunities in the forums on Fellowship Opportunities and also Research. A useful way to identify opportunities is to search by keywords such as fellowship, scholarship, graduate, Ph.D., "Call for Applications", etc.
    2. American Political Science Association Funding Resources-
    3. Rotary Peace and Conflict Studies Fellowship - Rotary Centers provide Rotary World Peace Fellows with the opportunity to pursue a master’s degree in conflict resolution, peace studies, international relations, and related areas. Each year, up to 60 Rotary World Peace Fellowships are offered on a competitive basis at six Rotary Centers, which operate in partnership with seven leading universities. Applications need to be over 25 years of age and have several years experience.
    4. Echoing Green's Fellowship Program - Echoing Green awards two-year fellowships to emerging social innovators. Annually, we award fellowships to individuals with innovative ideas for creating new models for tackling seemingly unsolvable social challenges. These fellowships offer them the opportunity to develop and test their ideas.
    5. *Ford International Fellowships - The Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program (IFP) was launched by the Ford Foundation in 2000 to provide opportunities for advanced study to exceptional individuals who will use this education to become leaders in their respective fields, furthering development in their own countries and greater economic and social justice worldwide. To ensure that Fellows are drawn from diverse backgrounds, IFP actively seeks candidates from social groups and communities that lack systematic access to higher education. IFP's New York-based secretariat collaborates closely with partner organizations in 22 countries and territories.
    6. **Fulbright Fellowships** – Offers fellowship for US students and faculty to study and conduct research/teaching abroad and for international students and faculty to pursue opportunities in the US.
    7. United States Institute of Peace Senior and Ph.D. Fellowships – The Jennings Randolph Program for International Peace awards Senior Fellowships to enable outstanding scholars, policymakers, journalists, and other professionals from around the world to conduct research at the U.S. Institute of Peace on important issues concerning international conflict and peace. Peace Scholar Dissertation Fellowships (open to Ph.D. students studying in the US). These fellowships are intended to support the research and writing of doctoral dissertations addressing the sources and nature of international conflict and ways of preventing or ending conflict and sustaining peace.
    8. The Davis-Putter Scholarship Fund (US) The Davis-Putter Scholarship Fund provides grants to students actively working for peace and justice. These need-based scholarships are awarded to those able to do academic work at the university level and who are part of the progressive movement on the campus and in the community.
    9. The Herbert Scoville Jr.Peace Fellowship (US) The Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship invites college graduates (Graduate Student or Ph.D./M.D./Other Professional) to apply for full-time, six to nine-month fellowships in Washington, District of Columbia. Outstanding individuals will be selected to work with nonprofit, public-interest organizations addressing peace and security issues.
    10. ***National Security Education Program** – The National Security Education Program (NSEP) provides a unique funding opportunity for U.S. students (undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate) to study world regions critical to U.S. interests (including Africa, Asia, Central/Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America & the Caribbean, and the Middle East). NSEP was designed to provide Americans with the resources and encouragement they need to acquire skills and experiences in areas of the world critical to the future security of our nation in exchange for a commitment to seek work in the federal government.
    11. Thomas Pickering Fellowship (Graduate and Undergraduate). The goal of the fellowship Graduate Fellowship program is to attract outstanding students who enroll in two-year master's degree programs in public policy, international affairs, public administration, or academic fields such as business, economics, political science, sociology, or foreign languages, who represent all ethnic, racial and social backgrounds and who have an interest in pursuing a Foreign Service career in the U.S. Department of State. The Pickering Undergraduate Foreign Affairs Fellowship seeks to recruit talented students in academic programs relevant to international affairs, political and economic analysis, administration, management, and science policy. The goal is to attract outstanding students from all ethnic, racial, and social backgrounds who have an interest in pursuing a Foreign Service career in the U.S. Department of State.
    12. Gates Cambridge FellowshipThe Gates Cambridge Scholarship is a merit-based scholarship established by the Gates Cambridge Trust in order to give students from around the world the opportunity to study at Cambridge in one of three programs: a second Bachelor's degree, one-year postgraduate course leading to a Master's degree, or research and work leading to a Ph.D. (scholars are funded for a period of 1 to 4 years). The Gates Cambridge Scholarship provides University tuition, a stipend for living expenses, and one return airfare.

Rob Darrow - Grant Websites


Braitmayer Foundation - http://www.braitmayerfoundation.org/guid.htm
The Foundation is pleased to have its grants used anywhere in the United States as seed money, challenge grants, or to match other grants to the recipient organizations. The Foundation does not make grants to individuals, multi year grants, nor grants for general operating, endowment purposes or building programs. Unless a small percentage of the total amount requested, normally the Foundation does not make grants for childcare, pre-kindergarten, or after school programs nor for equipment including hardware, software, and books. Presently, the Foundation has two mechanisms for making grants depending upon their size. Grant periods: June 1 and Nov. 15.

Federal Government Grants. http://grants.gov/
Grants.gov is your source to FIND and APPLY for federal government grants. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is proud to be the managing partner for Grants.gov, an initiative that is having an unparalleled impact on the grant community. Learn more about Grants.gov and determine if you are eligible for grant opportunities offered on this site. Subscribe to announcements about upcoming grant programs that are delivered via email (http://grants.gov/applicants/email_subscription.jsp).

Foundation Center, Education. http://foundationcenter.org/focus/education/
Established in 1956 and today supported by close to 600 foundations, the Foundation Center is a national nonprofit service organization recognized as the nation’s leading authority on organized philanthropy, connecting nonprofits and the grantmakers supporting them to tools they can use and information they can trust. Its audiences include grantseekers, grantmakers, researchers, policymakers, the media, and the general public. The Center maintains the most comprehensive database on U.S. grantmakers and their grants; issues a wide variety of print, electronic, and online information resources; conducts and publishes research on trends in foundation growth, giving, and practice; and offers an array of free and affordable educational programs.
Top 50 Foundations that give to Education (pdf) (courtesy of the Foundation Center)

Foundation Center, Grants for Researchers Information. http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/guides/research.html
Because most private foundations make grants only to incorporated nonprofit organizations, individual grantseekers must follow a different funding path than organizations with tax-exempt status. Some private foundations currently offer support for individual projects; it is up to you to determine which foundations might be interested in your particular subject area or project.

Broad Foundation - http://www.broadeducation.org/
The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation is a national entrepreneurial philanthropy that seeks to dramatically transform American urban public education so that all children receive the skills and knowledge to succeed in college, careers and life. Current investments are effective leadership, efficient organizations, healthy competition, human capital, and best practices.

Wallace Foundation - http://www.wallacefoundation.org/Pages/default.aspx
The Wallace Foundation seeks to support and share effective ideas and practices that will strengthen education leadership, arts participation and out-of-school learning. The Wallace Foundation, nationally recognized today for its involvement in educational and cultural programs, traces its origins back a half century to the philanthropic impulses of DeWitt and Lila Acheson Wallace, founders of The Reader’s Digest Association.

James Irvine Foundation - http://www.irvine.org/
The mission of the James Irvine Foundation is to expand opportunity for the people of California to participate in a vibrant, successful and inclusive society. James Irvine, a California agricultural pioneer, established the Irvine Foundation in 1937 to benefit the people of California. Since then, the Foundation has met the objectives of its founder by providing over $1 billion in grants to more than 3,000 nonprofit organizations. The guiding principle in all our activities is the idea of expanding opportunity, whether it is by helping youth navigate critical transitions in their lives, by fostering creativity and nuturing a rich cultural environment, or by improving decision making on critical issues facing California today and into the future. Our vision is a state where full and active participation by all Californians becomes a reality.

Walton Family Foundation - http://www.waltonfamilyfoundation.org/
The Walton Family Foundation pursues a philanthropic mission established by Sam and Helen Walton, which began modestly in the small town of Bentonville, Arkansas. When Sam Walton opened the original “Walton's Five and Dime” in 1950 he did so with a strong belief in the power of an individual to make a positive difference in his or her own life and community. Throughout a career that created Wal-Mart, one of the world’s leading companies, Sam Walton believed strongly in achievement, and that included philanthropic commitment and results as well as corporate success. Sam and Helen Walton’s philosophy of giving is based on life-long experiences in small town Northwest Arkansas that teach the value of personal engagement and involvement, the power of education in society, and that making philanthropic investments should make an appreciable difference in communities.

San Mateo County Peninsula Conflict Resolution Center. http://www.pcrcweb.org/index.jsp
An example of how one region is handling resources for conflict resolution education. The mission of the Peninsula Conflict Resolution Center (PCRC) is to promote positive collaboration and active engagement by residents in the communities we serve. To accomplish this mission, PCRC trains people to communicate and solve problems together, facilitates group meetings, builds skills for public participation and, as a neutral third party, assists people in conflict to develop mutually acceptable agreements.

Grant Websites from Shannon Lawrence

Stuart Foundation. http://www.stuartfoundation.org/index.cfm
Based in San Francisco. The Stuart Foundation invests financial resources and staff time in a coordinated set of programs, activities, research, and policy analysis to improve opportunities for children and youth to become self-reliant, responsible, and contributing members of their communities.

Sprint Character Education Grant Program - http://www.sprint.com/responsibility/education/character/index.html
Sprint and the Sprint Foundation are committed to supporting K–12 education initiatives within the focus area of character education. In 2008, the Sprint Foundation launched a national education grant program. The program is open to all US public schools (K-12) and US public school districts and provides grant funding to support character education programs.

Compton Foundation. http://www.comptonfoundation.org/
In a world that is increasingly interrelated, the Compton Foundation seeks to foster human and ecological security by addressing contemporary threats to these inalienable rights. We support responsible stewardship that respects the rights of future generations to a balanced and healthy ecology, both personal and global, allowing for the full richness of human experience. The Foundation envisions a world in which humans live in harmony with each other, and in sustainable balance with the earth. To realize this vision, the Compton Foundation focuses most of its grantmaking in the areas of Peace & Security, Environment & Sustainability, and Population & Reproductive Health, with a special emphasis on projects that explore the interconnections between these categories.

University of Maryland College of Law. http://www.law.umaryland.edu/programs/cdrum/initiatives/education_grant.html
Example of how a partnership between the Maryland Judiciary's Mediation and Conflict Resolution Office (MACRO), in conjunction with the Center for Dispute Resolution at the University of Maryland School of Law (C-DRUM) and the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) are sponsoring a school conflict resolution program. The program awards one-year grants to schools that create conflict resolution programs. Grant recipients develop and implement innovative and comprehensive conflict resolution programs to change their school's cultures. The grants program began in 2003 and has been offered annually. These grants are for schools in Maryland.

National Schools of Character. http://www.character.org/site/c.gwKUJhNYJrF/b.1761695/k.58CF/National_Schools_of_Character_Awards.htm
Every year, CEP names 10 public and private schools and districts (K-12) as National Schools of Character (NSOC) for their outstanding work in character education. Winning schools and districts receive a $20,000 award, half of which is used for outreach to other schools and districts. Winners may differ in their methods and implementation but all have comprehensive, exemplary character education programs that exemplify CEP’s Eleven Principles of Effective Character Education and serve as models for others. The criteria used to judge National Schools of Character award winners is CEP’s Character Education Quality Standards. As part of the application process, applicants score themselves using this document.

Institute of Global Conflict and Cooperation Research, Conference, and Teaching Grants. http://www-igcc.ucsd.edu/igcc2/campus/RGapp.menu.html
Institute of Global Conflict and Cooperation (IGCC) research and teaching grants are awarded to University of California (UC) faculty to stimulate independent research and education projects on international issues of contemporary importance. Grants support research and teaching on the nine UC campuses on the causes of international conflict and opportunities to promote international cooperation. IGCC research, research conference, and teaching grants are designed to stimulate independent research and education projects on international issues of contemporary importance. Topics of interest are posted on the Web site, as are application procedures.
Requirements:
Applications are accepted from UC faculty in all disciplines. Collaborative work is encouraged; however, the principal investigator must have an integral role in the project. Collaborative projects between UC faculty and the scientific and the technical staff of the national laboratories are eligible. Research projects may be either theoretical or policy analytical.
Amount of Grant:
$15,000 maximum
Date(s) Application Is Due:
February 1. Postmark satisfies deadline date requirements.
Contact:
Bettina Halvorson, Campus Program Coordinator, Institute of Global Conflict and Cooperation, (858) 534-7224, e-mail: bhalvorsen@ucsd.edu
Sponsor:

University of California, San Diego. 9500 Gilman Dr, Department 0518. La Jolla, CA 92093-0518

American Psychological Foundation -
www.apa.org/apf/precollege.html
Scope: The American Psychological Foundation requests proposals from programs that support the science and application of psychological science among talented high school students, and to support high quality education in psychology and the nurturing of the next generation of psychologists.
Areas: Goals of the program are to reinforce the discipline of psychology as a science in secondary school curricula, expand the profile of psychology as a science to attract talented high school students to pursue the discipline, convey to high school students that psychological science is a tool to improve society, and
teach students about career options that apply psychology outside of an academic setting (NASA or organizational development)
Deadline:
May 1. Funds: Grants up to $20,000
Eligibility: Educational institutions or nonprofit organizations
Contact: Emily Leary, program officer, American Psychology Foundation, 750 First Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20002-4242; (202) 336-5843; email: eleary@apa.org

Allstate Foundation Grant - www.allstate.com
The Allstate Foundation provides grants to nonprofit organizations to support projects and programs related to tolerance, diversity and inclusion; safe and vital communities; and economic empowerment. Tolerance, inclusion and diversity requests focus on teaching tolerance to youth, alleviating discrimination, and/or reducing hate crimes. Safe and vital communities requests focus on catastrophe response and mitigation, school anti-violence, and/or revitalization of communities. Economic empowerment requests focus on financial and insurance education, economic literacy, and/or entrepreneurial/small business skill development initiatives for women. Local education agencies and schools are eligible to apply. Grants are awarded for a maximum of $10,000.
Deadline:
Ongoing. Contact: Executive Director, The Allstate Foundation, 2775 Sanders Road, Suite F4, Northbrook, IL 60062-6127; email: allfound@allstate.com;

Coca-Cola Foundation Grants -
http://www2.coca-cola.com/citizenship/foundation_guidelines.html
The Coca-Cola Foundation has three focus areas for its grant-making: Innovative K-12 public school programs, teacher development programs, and smaller projects dealing with specific activities in the elementary and secondary classroom. The application form is available on-line.

Deadline: Grant requests are reviewed quarterly.
Funds: Grants typically range from $5000 to $25,000.
Contact: 404-676-2568 (phone); 404-676-8804 (fax); P. O. Box 1734, Atlanta, GA 30301.

America Honda Foundation - http://www.hondacorporate.com/community/?subsection=foundation
Grants are offered for nonprofits, including schools, for projects that encourage innovative educational methods and techniques. Eligible projects focus on math, science, the environment and technology. Application form is available online.
Deadlines: Quarterly: Nov. 1, Feb. 1, May 1, Aug. 1. Funds: Grants typically range from $10,000 - $75,000

Barnes and Noble
Barnes and Noble supports local and regional nonprofit organizations (which can include schools) in the communities where its stores are located. Support goes to organizations focused on literacy, the arts, or K-12 education. Grant sizes vary and may include book donations. A plan for promoting the program with Barnes and Noble should be included in the proposal. Barnes and Noble will not contribute to grant or scholarship programs, religious organizations, sports teams or events, political organizations, or medical or health-related causes.

No deadline. Submit proposals locally. Proposals will be reviewed locally and a limited number of proposals will be forwarded to the district manager and regional community relations manager for approval. Allow 60 days for a decision.
Contact: Submit proposals to the community relations manager or store manager at your local Barnes and Noble store.

Bubel/Aiken Foundation -
www.bubelaiken.org/grantsPrograms/Grants/tabid/62/Default.aspx
Scope: The Bubel/Aiken Foundation supports programs that focus on the inclusion of children with special needs.
Deadline: Online inquiries accepted from March 1 to July 31, 2009
Funds: Grants range from $1000 to $20,000
Eligibility: K-12 schools and nonprofit organizations
Areas: Apply under one of the following four grant initiatives: Let’s All Play; Inclusive Recreational and Learning Experiences Promoting Awareness, Education and Health; Financial Assistance for Child Participation in Approved Inclusive Programs; and Continuing education
Contact: The Bubel/Aiken Foundation, 8601 Six Forks road, Suite 400, Raleigh, NC 27615; (919) 882-2152. Email: contactus@bubelaiken.org

Cooper Industries Foundation
- **http://www.cooperindustries.com/common/aboutCooper/corporateGiving.cfm?topic=ContributionGuidelines**
Scope: The
Cooper Industries Foundation supports communities through Cooper Industries, a manufacturer of electrical products, tools and hardware. Educational organizations are a primary focus of Cooper’s charitable giving. Cooper supports community libraries; mentoring programs; vocational schools; and college scholarship programs. While the foundation supports a wide variety of educational efforts, it places particular emphasis on enhancing vocational education, because it feels vocational programs provide students with valuable training and practical skills to be better positioned for competitive technical jobs in the future.
Deadline: The foundation accepts and reviews budget requests throughout the year.
Funds: In 2004, the foundation awarded $230,000 in funding to community and environmental causes. A sampling of grant awards in 2005 shows a range of $310 to $89,000 per award.
Eligibility: With a few exceptions, the foundation supports nonprofit, 501 (c)(3) organizations and K-12 programs.
Contact: Nonprofits should direct requests to the local Cooper management in their community for initial considerations; details available on the company Web page.

Dana Corporation Foundation Grant

The Dana Corporation Foundation provides grants to schools in communities where the Dana Corporation has major facilities. Funds may be used for underprivileged and/or at-risk students to participate in after-school and/or field trip experiences. Expenses funded include: student transportation, lodging, meals, entrance fees, etc. Funding awards vary, and multiple grants may be awarded.
Deadline: Ongoing. Applications MUST be obtained at the local Dana Corporation facility.
Local Contact: Darrell Cummings, 1491 Eaton Dr., Henderson, KY 42420; (270) 827-2511, ext. 133

Educational Foundation of America - **www.efaw.org**
Scope: The
Educational Foundation of America, established in 1959 by the co-founder of Prentice-Hall educational publishers, seeks to encourage progressive change with its grant making. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to, the environment, reproductive freedom, theatre, education, medicine drug policy reform, democracy, peace and national security issues and human services.
Areas: The foundation prefers to make innovative pilot project or seed grants that could have national or international ramifications. It avoids contributions to projects so large that a grant would not make a significant difference, and long-term support.
Deadline: Letters of inquiry, submitted by e-mail using EFA’s online form, are accepted year-round. EFA staff reviews all letters, and requests further information as needed. If interested, an EFA board member will be assigned as sponsor and a letter of invitation for full application issued.
Funds: Recent grants ranged from $10,000 to $400,000 each.
Eligibility: Nonprofit organizations that have IRS tax-exempt status and are not private foundations.

The Starr Foundation -
**http://fdncenter.org/grantmaker/starr**
The
Starr Foundation was created by the estate of Mr. Starr, a pioneer of globalization, and is one of the largest private foundations in the United States. The foundation has assets of approximately $3.5 billion and makes grants in a number of areas, including education, medicine and health care, human needs, public policy, culture and the environment. The foundation has no set guidelines, except that requests fall into an area of interest: education, medicine and health care, human needs, public policy, and culture. An application form is not required.
Deadline: None. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.
Funds: In 2003, an average grant was $25,000 to $125,000.
Contact: The Starr Foundation, 399 Park Ave., 17th Floor, New York, NY 10022, (212) 909-3600


Teaching Tolerance Grant -
www.teachingtolerance.org

Funds are provided through this grant to classroom teachers for implementing tolerance projects in their schools and communities. The grant must target small-scale, resourceful, student-focused projects that promote acceptance of diversity, peacemaking, community service or any other aspect of tolerance education. Grants are a maximum of $2000. Deadline: Ongoing. Contact: Grants Administrator, Teaching Tolerance Grants, 400 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104;


Ron Oxford – Grant Websites
Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education - Comprehensive Program - http://www.ed.gov/programs/fipsecomp/index.html

The Comprehensive Program is the central grant competition of the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE). The competition is designed to support innovative reform projects that hold promise as models for the resolution of important issues and problems in postsecondary education.

Atlantic Philanthropies - http://www.atlanticphilanthropies.org/
The Atlantic Philanthropies identify and support leaders, institutions, and organizations dedicated to learning, knowledge-building, and solving pressing social problems. They proactively fund programs and projects that value voluntary service, philanthropic giving, scholarship, and research.

Fulbright Senior Specialists Program - http://www.cies.org/specialists/
About to begin its fourth year, the Fulbright Senior Specialists Program offers short-term grants of 2-6 weeks to U.S. faculty and professionals in a variety of fields, including Peace and Conflict Resolution Studies and its sub disciplines. Program activities are designed to provide U.S. faculty and professionals with opportunities to collaborate with international counterparts at host academic institutions abroad on curriculum and faculty development, institutional planning, and a variety of other activities.

MacArthur Foundation - http://www.macfound.org/site/c.lkLXJ8MQKrH/b.3599935/k.66CA/MacArthur_Foundation_Home.htm
The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grant making institution dedicated to helping groups and individuals foster lasting improvement in the human condition. The Foundation seeks the development of healthy individuals and effective communities; peace within and among nations; responsible choices about human reproduction; and a global ecosystem capable of supporting healthy human societies. The Foundation pursues this mission by supporting research, policy development, dissemination, education and training, and practice.

The Ford Foundation - www.fordfound.org/
The Ford Foundation is a resource for innovative people and institutions worldwide. Their stated goals are to: strengthen democratic values, reduce poverty and injustice, promote international cooperation and advance human achievement through grant making and loans. Their three current program areas include asset building and community development, peace and social justice, and education, media, arts and culture.

Carnegie Corporation of New York - www.carnegie.org/index.html
Carnegie Corporation of New York was created by Andrew Carnegie in 1911 to promote "the advancement and diffusion of knowledge and understanding." The Corporation makes grants in the areas of education, international peace and security, international development, and democracy.

Peace Development Fund - www.peacefund.org/
The Peace Development Fund is a public foundation providing grants, training, and other resources in partnership with communities, organizations, trainers, and donors with whom the organization shares a common vision for change. Generally, the Peace Development Fund works to strengthen a broad-based social justice movement that embodies, embraces, and honors many cultures to create the new systems and institutions essential to building a peaceful, just, and equitable world.

Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation - www.hfg.org
The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation sponsors scholarly research on problems of violence, aggression, and dominance. The foundation provides both research grants to established scholars and dissertation fellowships to graduate students during the dissertation-writing year.

A.J. Muste Memorial Institute - www.ajmuste.org/
The A.J. Muste Memorial Institute was organized to keep alive the spirit of the man whose name it bears, functioning in his area of primary concern--the exploration of the link between nonviolence and social change. A.J. Muste always met the challenge of the present in a direct way, and was exhilarated by the potential of the future. The Institute operates in that spirit, applying its resources to the nonviolent struggle for social justice and a peaceful future.

The Russell Sage Foundation - www.russellsage.org/
The Russell Sage Foundation is the principal American foundation devoted exclusively to research in the social sciences. Located in New York City, the Foundation is a research center, a funding source for studies by scholars at other academic and research institutions, and an active member of the nation's social science community. The Foundation currently pursues four programs: A program of research on the future of work, concerned with the causes and consequences of the decline in demand for low-skill workers in advanced economies; A program of research on current U.S. immigration focused on the adaptation of the second generation to American society; A program on cultural contact that focuses on understanding and improving relations between racial and ethnic groups in schools, workplaces, and neighborhood settings; and a program that supports research on curricula designed to foster active literacy among disadvantaged students.

Arcus Foundation - www.arcusfoundation.org
The Arcus Foundation, located in Kalamazoo, Michigan, is a family foundation established in 1997 that seeks to "contribute to a pluralistic society that celebrates diversity and dignity, invests in youth and justice, and promotes tolerance and compassion." A full list of the Foundation's values is posted on the Web site. The Foundation funds programs that fight prejudice and discrimination and protect and defend human and civil rights. It supports new, innovative, and experimental programs and projects, creative uses of resources, and collaborative efforts.

Tracy Smith Grant Websites


United States Institute of Peace – **www.usip.org**
The Annual Grant Competition – http://www.usip.org/grants/

The United States Institute of Peace is an independent, nonpartisan federal institution created and funded by Congress to strengthen the nation's capacity to promote the peaceful resolution of international conflict. The Institute has an array of programs including grants, fellowships, conferences and workshops, library services, publications, and other educational activities. This grant program supports innovative peace building projects involving research, the identification of promising models and effective practices, the development of practitioner resources and tools, the development and delivery of education, training and dialogue programs, and the production of films, radio programs, and other media.

The Grantsmanship Center (TGCI) - http://www.tgci.com/
TGCI offers grantsmanship training and low-cost publications to nonprofit organizations and government agencies. Their website has a Grant Sourcessection with free access to information about federal, state, community and international grant opportunities, and a "Grants Proposal" section that for a fee has full-text recently funded, top-ranked grant proposals in: education; arts & humanities; health; housing; law enforcement; substance abuse; and disabilities & Rehabilitation. Abstracts of over 800 proposals can be obtained for free.

Michigan State University Grants and Related Resources -- Academic Sites -
http://www.lib.msu.edu/harris23/grants/academic.htm
This site is a collection of academic funding resource links useful for conflict researchers and practitioners.

WheatRidgeMinistries
- http://www.wheatridge.org/
Wheat Ridge is an independent Lutheran charitable organization that provides support for new church-related health and hope ministries that build healthy communities which build peace, respect and harmony among people. Current major grant categories include: anti-racism, peacemaking and leadership training.

Johnny Alvarado Websites
Learning & Leadership Grants: www.service-learningpartnership.org
The National Education Agency Learning & Leadership grants program provide opportunities for teachers, education support professionals, and higher education faculty and staff to engage in high-quality professional development and lead their colleagues in professional growth.

Eligibility: Applicants must work in the U.S. and be one of the following: public school teachers in grades K12, public school education support professionals, or faculty and staff at public higher education institutions. Those who have less than seven years experience and/or are education support professionals are especially encouraged to apply.
Maximum Award: $2,000 for individuals and $5,000 for groups engaged in collegial study.
Deadline: Next deadline: June 1.

**Student Achievement Grants** www.service-learningpartnership.org
The National Education Agency will provide awards to improve the academic achievement of students by engaging in critical thinking and problem solving that deepen knowledge of standards-based subject matter. The work should also improve students' habits of inquiry, self-directed learning, and critical reflection.

Eligibility: Applicants must work in the U.S. and be one of the following: public school teachers in grades K12, public school education support professionals, or faculty and staff at public higher education institutions. Those who have less than seven years experience and/or are education support professionals are especially encouraged to apply.
Maximum Award : $5,000
Deadline: June 1.

**Start Something Awards**: www.**service**-**learning**partnership.org
Developed by Target Corporation along with the Tiger Woods Foundation, Start Something is a free program for youth ages 8 to 17 that addresses three national education priorities: character education, service-learning, and career exploration. Students who complete the program may apply for scholarships of up to $5,000 to help them continue to develop their talents and pursue a dream or goal.

Eligibility: Young people ages 8-17
Maximum Award: $5,000
Deadline: Ongoing

**Paying for Youth-Initiated Service Projects**
: www.**service**-**learning**partnership.org
The Pay It Forward Foundation offers grants to fund service-oriented projects designed by youth to support their school, neighborhood, or greater community.
Eligibility: Youth leaders, school staff, and youth-group representatives.
Award: $50-500
Deadlines: October 15, January 15, and April 15

**Mix it Up Grants**
: **www.service-learningpartnership.org**
The Southern Poverty Law Center awards grants to support youth-directed programs and projects that address social boundaries in schools or communities.
Eligibility: Ongoing youth-directed projects
Award: $500
Deadline: Ongoing

Mark Sanchez Websites

Fresno Regional Foundationswww.fresnoregfoundation.org
Youth grants fund youth programs that address social, economic and health challenges, empower youth, and promote civic engagement and service learning among youth in our community. K-12 and higher education grants are fine. Human services grants fund capacity-building activities for organizations with programs and services in social, education, economic and health arenas.

Rockefeller Brothers Fund – www.rbf.org/grants
Prospective applicants are strongly encouraged to read through the Rockefeller Brothers Fund's program guidelines and view recently awarded grants for examples of the Fund's current funding focus. Applicants may also find the eligibility quiz helpful in determining whether a proposed project is compatible with the Fund's funding priorities.

Small Grants Program of the U.S. Embassy 2009 - http://bangkok.usembassy.gov/root/pdfs/small_grants_prog_call_for_proposals_2009.pdf
Accepting applications for grants from Thai non-governmental organization (NGOs), Voluntary Private Organizations (VPOs), and other non-profit organizations. To be eligible for consideration, every applicant must be engaged in, or propose to carry out, a project whose purpose is to support:

  • Development of civil society, including civic education and engagement, and youth leadership.
  • Enhancing economic opportunity for vulnerable groups, especially youth
  • Mitigation of the impact of the conflict in Thailand's South
  • Conflict resolution

The Consortium on Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (CNCR) -Conflict Management in Higher Education - http://law.gsu.edu/cncr/index/research
Consistent with the mission of the CNCR is the study of institutionalization of Conflict Management (CM) in the University System of Georgia. The Board of Regents' Initiative and Policy Direction on Conflict Resolution, enacted in 1995, required each of the 34 institutions within the University System of Georgia to design and implement a CM program to meet their individual needs.
In collaboration with the Chancellor's Office, the CNCR provides technical expertise and training support for the Initiative; administers the System-wide Mediation Program; and, conducts periodic evaluation on the development and implementation of CM.


The National Association for Community Mediation (NAFCM) - http://www.nafcm.org/
NAFCM Minigrant program funds projects yearly to support conflict resolution centers.


CASEL or Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning - http://www.casel.org/
Our mission is to establish social and emotional learning (SEL) as an essential part of education.

Gary Lowe Section


Charles Stewart Mott Foundation
Website: http://www.mott.org/


The Charles Stewart Mott Foundation is a philanthropic and grant funding organizations Grantmaking is organized in four program areas: civil society, environment, Flint (Michigan), and pathways out of poverty. The Mott Foundation makes grants in the United States and around the world. About 20 percent of our grants are international. In all of their grantmaking, they are particularly interested in: fresh approaches to solving community problems in our defined program areas; approaches that, if proven successful, can generate long-term support from other sources and/or be replicated in other communities when appropriate; public policy development and research and development activities to further existing programs, as well as to explore new fields of interest; and approaches and activities that lead to systemic change.

The Joyce Mertz-Gilmore Foundation
Website: http://www.mertzgilmore.org/

The Joyce Mertz-Gilmore Foundation is a grant-making organization that funds projects in the areas of international peace, human rights, energy policy and interests in the New York City region. The foundation has been involved in peace and civil rights issues for a number of years. Their grantmaking is logical extension of that work. They are also committed to the quality of life in New York City and make grants to city performing arts groups and to groups working to protect the citys environment. Their interest in the environment leads them to support programs reaching beyond the city to include national and global issues as well.

Fellowship - New Voices
Website: http://newvoices.aed.org/


This program awards two-year grants to US-based nonprofit organizations working in foreign policy, international economic policy, peace and security, racial justice, migrant and refugee rights, women's rights, and international human rights. The grants enable nonprofits to recruit new talent in high impact leadership roles. Awards include salary, fringe benefits, financial assistance, mentoring, and a professional development account. Host organizations also receive technical assistance from national and local experts and a computer to support the work of the Fellow.

The Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation
Website: http://www.mrbf.org/


The Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation supports people in the Southeast to build just and caring communities that nurture people, spur enterprise, bridge differences, foster fairness, and promote civility. The Foundation carries out this commitment through three funding areas: Grassroots Leadership Development, Community Problem Solving, and Enterprise and Asset Development. In addition, the Foundation supports all of its grantees with grants and peer-led training opportunities to pursue organizational development goals.


The Appalachian Community Fund
Website: http://www.appalachiancommunityfund.org/


The Appalachian Community Fund was founded in 1986 as a regionally based and regionally controlled source of funding for work on economic, environmental, racial, and social justice issues. ACF has given over $2 million in grants to 260 community organizations in four areas of Central Appalachia: eastern Kentucky, southwest Virginia, east Tennessee and all of West Virginia. These groups are revitalizing a region whose rich and varied culture and natural resources have been taken for vast profits, leaving behind the deepest rural poverty in the nation.

U.S. Department of Justice: Violence Against Women Office (VAMO)
Website:http://www.ovw.usdoj.gov/
The Violence Against Women Office of the Office of Justice Programs, United States Department of Justice was created in 1995 to implement the 1994 Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) and to lead the national effort to stop domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. The Violence Against Women Office works with U.S. Attorneys to ensure enforcement of the federal criminal statutes contained in the 1994 Act, assists the Attorney General in formulating policy related to civil and criminal justice for women, and administers more than $270 million a year in grants to help states, tribes, and local communities transform the way in which criminal justice systems respond to crimes of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking.
Crossroads Fund
Website: http://www.crossroadsfund.org/


The Crossroads Fund is a public foundation that raises money to support organizations working on issues of social and economic justice in the Chicago metropolitan area.

A Territory Resource
Website:
http://www.atrfoundation.org/

A Territory Resource (ATR) is a public foundation that supports activist, community-based organizations working for social, economic, and environmental justice across the Northwest in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming.

The Fieldstone Foundation
Website: http://www.fieldstone-homes.com/foundation/

The Fieldstone Foundation was created by the Fieldstone Group of Companies in 1983 to support nonprofit organizations serving the communities where we build: Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, and San Diego Counties in Southern California and Salt Lake City in Utah. Our donations are focused in the following areas: humanitarian, community and education, cultural arts, and Christian ministries. Of particular interest to the Foundation are programs serving children and families. Other funding priorities include the prevention of child abuse and domestic and community violence. In addition, we seek to fund organizations providing child care services, emergency assistance for youth and families, positive alternatives for youth and positive responses to diversity.

Weaver Foundation
Website: http://www.weaverfoundation.com/


The Weaver Foundation was founded in 1967 by W. Herman Weaver and H. Michael Weaver with the intention of supporting activities and causes that benefit the Greater Greensboro area. Since its establishment, the Directors have been interested in supporting community improvement, environmental activities, educational development, helping the disadvantaged and advancing human and civil rights, racial tolerance, and diversity. Specifically, the Foundation's mission is to "help the Greater Greensboro community enhance and improve the quality of life and the economic environment for its citizens while developing a sense of philanthropy, civic education and commitment in current and future generations of the founders' families."

The Fund for Santa Barbara
Website: http://www.fundforsantabarbara.org/


The Fund for Santa Barbara is a nonprofit, community foundation supporting progressive social change. We fund projects that advocate, educate, and organize in order to examine and address social and economic problems, such as racial and ethnic prejudice, sexism, homophobia, homelessness, social injustice, violence, and environmental damage.

Norman Foundation, Inc.
Website: http://www.normanfdn.org/


The New York-based Norman Foundation is committed to a strategy of seeking and supporting grassroots efforts that strengthen the ability of communities to determine their economic, environmental and civic well-being; promote community-based economic development efforts that are trying out new ownership structures and financing mechanisms; work to prevent the use of toxics and their disposal into the environment; build bridges across issues and constituencies and organize to counter the "radical right" in all its forms; promote civil rights by fighting discrimination and violence and working for ethnic, religious, and sexual equity and for reproductive freedom; challenge the power of money over our political process; and/or seek to improve governments' and businesses' accountability to the public and especially to those affected by their actions. The Foundation also seeks to address "the profound civic disengagement in society," and is particularly interested in strategies "on how to engage more Americans in their civic lives and how to increase their faith and involvement in community institutions."

The General Mills Foundation
Website: http://www.generalmills.com/corporate/commitment/foundation.aspx


The General Mills Foundation is entrusted with making a significant positive impact in their communities and focusing on specific projects where their efforts will make a difference through philanthropy, product donation, volunteerism and social investment. The Foundation supports programs that strengthen families and promote a safe, nurturing environment for children and youth, and it emphasizes violence prevention initiatives.

Global Fund for Women
Website: http://www.globalfundforwomen.org/cms/


The Global Fund for Women is a grantmaking foundation supporting women's human rights organizations around the world working to address critical issues such as gaining economic independence, increasing girls' access to education, and stopping violence against women.

Conflict Resolution and Safe Learning Environment Grants

Kim Boyer

1.

Community Grants Available Through the Allstate Foundation

Retrieved from: http://www.afterschoolnetwork.org/funding

Description/purpose of grant:

The Allstate Foundation is offering ongoing grants to promote safer communities, community revitalization, catastrophe assistance, non-profit organizations, environmental responsibility, and a more tolerant and inclusive society. To learn more, click the link:
http://www.allstate.com/citizenship/allstate-communities.aspx

Areas of interest of grantor: safer communities

2.

Pay it Forward Minigrants

Retrieved from: http://www.afterschoolnetwork.org/funding


Description/purpose of grant:
Pay it Forward Foundation’s - Pay It Forward Mini-Grants are designed to fund youth-identified projects with educational value that benefit their school, neighborhood, or greater community. Programs must illustrate how their projects will embody a “pay it forward” concept, where benefits multiply exponentially in the community. Grant applications are considered throughout the year.
For more information go to http://www.payitforwardfoundation.org/educators/grant.html
Areas of interest of grantor: safer school, neighborhoods and community
3.
Verizon Foundation Education Grants
Retrieved from: http://www.afterschoolnetwork.org/funding

Description/purpose of grant:
The Verizon Foundation is in the business of improving lives in literacy, knowledge and a readiness for the 21st Century.
Specifically, they help people to:
§ Increase their literacy and educational achievement
§ Avoid being an abuser or a victim of domestic violence
§ Achieve and sustain their health and safety
Eligible organizations seeking grants from the Verizon Foundation must be prepared to track and report program outcomes as well as specific results that demonstrate measurable human impact. In the grant application, organizations must indicate what outcomes are targeted through programming and what results, as specified on the grant application, the organization will measure.
Outcomes and results will be reported by the grantee on a quarterly basis. The Verizon Foundation uses this information to guide grantees in achieving stated outcomes and results, and to measure the social impact of Verizon's philanthropic investments in its community partners and the programs it supports.
Eligible Requests
Proposals will be considered from eligible tax-exempt organizations in certain 501(c)(3) subsections as defined by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).
Proposals will also be considered from elementary and secondary schools* (public and private) that are registered with the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). Proposals may also be considered from eligible tax-exempt organizations in the subsection 170(B)(1)(a)(i) - Church, provided that the proposal will benefit a large portion of a community without regard to religious affiliation and does not duplicate the work of other agencies in the community.
To be eligible for funding consideration organizations must:
§ Not duplicate or significantly overlap the work of public agencies on the federal, state or local level.
§ Serve the community without discrimination on the basis of age, color, citizenship, disability, disabled veteran status, gender, race, religion, national origin, marital status, sexual orientation, military service or status or Vietnam-era veteran status.
§ Keep books available for regular independent outside audit and make the results available to all potential contributors.
§ Comply with applicable laws regarding registration and reporting.
§ Observe the highest standards of business conduct in its relationships with the public.
How To Apply
Verizon Foundation only accepts electronic proposals through its Apply Online process. Successfully submitted online proposals receive an electronic notice confirming receipt of the application via e-mail. Please allow up to ninety (90) days for a final decision.
When to Apply
The Verizon Foundation reviews unsolicited proposals on a continuous calendar year basis from January 1st through October 31st.
Areas of interest for the grantor: safer schools and environment

4.
21st Century Community Learning Centers and 21st Century High school After School Safety and Enrichment for Teen Grants
Retrieved from: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ls/ba/

Description/purpose of grant:
The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 was signed into law in January 2002, authorizing the California Department of Education (CDE) to administer California's 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) program. Education Code sections 8484.7 - 8484.9 further define California's 21st CCLC program. This state-administered, federally funded program provides five-year grant funding to establish or expand before-and after-school programs that provide disadvantaged kindergarten through twelfth-grade students (particularly students who attend schools in need of improvement) with academic enrichment opportunities and supportive services to help the students meet state and local standards in core content areas.

Purpose

The purpose of the 21st CCLC program, as described in federal statute, is to provide opportunities for communities to establish or expand activities that focus on:
  1. Improved academic achievement
  2. Enrichment services that reinforce and complement the academic program, and
  3. Family literacy and related educational development services
Entities eligible to apply for funding include: local educational agencies (LEAs), cities, counties, community-based agencies, other public or private entities (which may include faith-based organizations), or a consortium of two or more such agencies, organizations, or entities. Applicants are required to plan their programs through a collaborative process that includes parents, youth, and representatives of participating schools or local educational agencies, governmental agencies (e.g., cities, counties, parks and recreation departments), community organizations, and the private sector.
While the CDE anticipates awarding grant funding for the California 21st CCLC program on a regular basis, it is important to note that grant funding for each fiscal year is contingent upon the availability of federal funds and the enactment of each respective federal and state Budget Act. When grant funding is available, the CDE After School Programs Office will conduct a competitive grant process that begins with the release of a Request for Applications, which will be posted at CDE's Available Funding. Additional program-specific information, including updates, funding opportunities, a list of grantees, regional and CDE staff support, resources, and fiscal and evaluation requirements/information, can be found at the above website.
Awards amounts: up to $150,000.00 a year for elementary/middle schools and up to $250,000.00 a year for high schools. Grants are awarded for five years.
Areas of interest of grantor: safe schools, safe learning environment and safe neighborhoods.

5.

After School Education and Safety (ASES) Program Grants
Retrieved from: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ls/ba/

Description/purpose of grant:
The After School Education and Safety (ASES) Program is the result of the 2002 voter approved initiative, Proposition 49. This proposition amended California Education Code (EC) 8482 to expand and rename the former Before and After School Learning and Safe Neighborhood Partnerships Program. The ASES Program funds the establishment of local after school education and enrichment programs. These programs are created through partnerships between schools and local community resources to provide literacy, academic enrichment and safe constructive alternatives for students in kindergarten through ninth grade (K-9). Funding is designed to: (1) maintain existing before and after school program funding; and (2) provide eligibility to all elementary and middle schools that submit quality applications throughout California. The current funding level for the ASES program is $550 million.

Purpose and Objectives

The ASES program provides an opportunity to merge school reform strategies with community resources. The goal is to support local efforts to improve assistance to students and broaden the base of support for education in a safe, constructive environment. It is the intent of ASES program legislation to encourage schools and school districts to provide safe and educationally enriching alternatives for children and youth during non-school hours. The program creates incentives for establishing locally driven before and after school education and enrichment programs.
The ASES program involves collaboration among parents, youth, representatives from schools and governmental agencies, such as local law enforcement and local parks and recreation departments, and individuals from community-based organizations and the private sector. Programs are created through partnerships between schools and local community resources to provide literacy, academic enrichment, and safe, constructive alternatives for students in grades K-9.

Program Elements

The ASES program must be aligned with, and not be a repeat of, the content of regular school day and other extended learning opportunities. A safe physical and emotional environment, as well as opportunities for relationship building, must be provided. After school programs must consist of the two elements below and ASES program leaders work closely with school site principals and staff to integrate both elements with the school's curriculum, instruction, and learning support activities.
  1. An educational and literacy element must provide tutoring and/or homework assistance designed to help students meet state standards in one or more of the following core academic subjects: reading/language arts, mathematics, history and social studies, or science. A broad range of activities may be implemented based on local student needs and interests.
  2. The educational enrichment element must offer an array of additional services, programs, and activities that reinforce and complement the school’s academic program. Educational enrichment may include but is not limited to, positive youth development strategies, recreation and prevention activities. Such activities might involve the visual and performing arts, music, physical activity, health/nutrition promotion, and general recreation; career awareness and work preparation activities; community service-learning; and other youth development activities based on student needs and interests. Enrichment activities may be designed to enhance the core curriculum.

Operational Requirements

All staff members who directly supervise pupils must meet the minimum qualifications, hiring requirements, and procedures for an instructional aide in the school district. School site principals approve site supervisors for the after school program and ensure that the program maintains a pupil-to-staff member ratio of no more than 20 to 1.
A nutritious snack is provided daily to students participating in the program. The snack provided must meet the standards identified in EC Section 49430.
ASES grantees are required to operate programs a minimum of 15 hours per week and at least until 6:00 p.m., beginning immediately upon conclusion of the regular school day. Programs must plan to operate every regular school day during the regular school year.

After School Programs

It is the intent of the legislation that elementary school pupils participate in the full day of the after school program every day. Middle schools may adopt a flexible schedule to meet student needs and interests to accomplish program goals; students may attend three days within nine hours. However, the program must remain operational five days per week and three hours per day on every regular school day.

Before School Programs

Elementary and middle school before school programs must operate for a minimum of one and one-half hours per day, or may operate up to two hours. Pupils must attend at least one-half of the daily program’s hours of operation to be counted for purposes of attendance. Middle schools may choose a flexible before school schedule designed to meet student needs and interests.

Evaluation Criteria

Before and/or after school programs participating in the ASES Program are required to submit annual student outcome data to the California Department of Education from local program evaluations. Data must include research-based indicators and measurable student outcomes for academic performance, attendance, and positive behavioral changes. The California Department of Education may consider the results of these evaluations when determining eligibility for three year grant renewal.
Award amounts: up to $112,500.00 a year for elementary schools and up to $150,000.00 a year for middle schools. This state funded grant is awarded for three years.

Areas of interest of grantor: safe schools, safe learning environment and safe neighborhoods.
6. __RGK Foundation Grant Program__
Retrieved from website: http://www.rgkfoundation.org/public/guidelines
Description/purpose of the grant:

RGK Foundation awards grants in the broad areas of Education, Community and Medicine/Health. The primary focus within Education includes teacher development. Within Community, the Foundation supports human services, community improvement, abuse prevention, and youth development programs. The Foundation's current interests in the area of Medicine/Health include programs that promote the health and well-being of child.
There is no deadline for this grant.
Areas of interest to the grantor: safe schools and community, youth development and citizenship